#Books

No, I haven't written any. But I read and always take notes. The entries below are some of the more comprehensive notes I've taken so I put them online. Always happy to talk about them. I'm also taking recommendations for what to read next.

Safiya Umoja Noble - "Algorithms of Oppression"

Important subject matter and good data-backed observations. On the other hand, a dry and somewhat uninspired execution. But maybe it’s partially due to the topic being unpleasant to deal with?

Jerry Z. Muller - "The Tyranny of Metrics"

Starts off very strong against metric fixation but at some devolves into an argument against transparency.

Emily Nagoski - "Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle"

A more accurate title for the book would have been “hashtag burnout: a feminist perspective”. As a man, I realize I’m not in the target audience for this book. I’ll keep this short and will not put a numeric rating.

Marshall Rosenberg - "Nonviolent Communication"

Nonviolent communication is about establishing a relationship of honesty and empathy. Here’s my notes from reading the book.

Julian Jaynes - "The Origin Of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind"

A fascinating and unexpected perspective on what makes us human. We are far less conscious than we think. I recommend you read it yourself as my summary below is rather hastily written.

John Kotter - "A Sense of Urgency"

Rather a tedious read but there’s some insight there nonetheless. I made some short working notes.

Chris Voss - "Never Split The Difference"

The best book on negotiation I’ve ever read. I successfully used the techniques described in it many times, including during some pivotal moments in my life. It does change how you perceive dealing with other people. What follows is a working synopsis that I come back to every now and then.

Stephen Batchelor - "Buddhism Without Beliefs"

Since death alone is certain and the time of death is uncertain - what should I do? What does it mean to lead a life that will stop? In this book Stephen argues that Dharma practice is the courage to confront what it means to be human. What follows is less of a review and more of a digest, or synopsis.

Eckhart Tolle - "Power of Now"

Profound ideas buried in pseudoscientific nonsense.

Miyamoto Musashi - "Book of Five Rings"

One of my favorites, it’s a poetic yet pragmatic depiction of Zen philosophy under the guise of a swordmanship manual. Here’s my working summary of the work.

Scott Rosenberg - "Dreaming In Code"

Follows the development of Chandler, a now defunct attempt at creating an open-source Outlook competitor. The company behind the project, OSAF, tried to differentiate themselves radically from typical software house corporations but ended up repeating every mistake in the book, including the ones described decades before in The Mythical Man Month.

Daniel Golberg - “Minecraft"

The Unlikely Tale of Markus “Notch” Persson and the Game That Changed Everything Not a great art piece. Nonetheless, an interesting book.